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Lumbar Muscle Spasms

Muscle spasms, sometimes called "charley horses", can occur in various muscles throughout the body. The most common areas to experience muscle cramps are the calf, foot, thigh, hand, arm, abdomen, neck, and back. Some last for only a few seconds, while others last for many minutes. Though the pain is relatively brief, it can be extremely intense. One of the most common areas to experience muscle spasms is in the lumbar spine (lower back). The lumbar spine provides the body with the ability to move in a wide range of motions, as well as flexibility and stability. Many muscles and ligaments are involved in supporting the lower back, and any irritation of these structures can trigger muscle spasms and pain. Improper lifting is a common cause of a lumbar muscle spasm. Many people bend at the back instead of bending at the hip and knees when lifting a heavy object. This puts strain upon the structures in the lower back, often leading to muscle spasms. Common symptoms are lower back pain and tension, muscle weakness, and stiffness.

Other possible causes of muscle spasms include: dehydration, electrolyte disturbances, calcium deficiency, magnesium deficiency, potassium deficiency, muscle fatigue, insufficient stretching before exercise, overexertion while exercising, poor blood circulation, malfunctioning nerves, or side effects from medication. If your muscle spasms have become a reoccurring circumstance, it is advisable to have a professional diagnosis so that a specialized treatment plan can be implemented. Although muscle cramps can be extremely painful and occur at random and often inconvenient times, in general, they are easily rectified with just a few modifications. But in order to fix it, the decisive cause must first be determined. Here at Spine and Sports Medicine, the physical therapists will work with you on manual therapy techniques and electrical stimulation that works to relieve pain and reduce muscle spasms. Our chiropractor will do a full examination of the affected area and work to restore correct joint position to any fixated joints that could be triggering the spasms. In addition, the medical massage offered here at Spine and Sports Medicine has been very effective in relieving muscle pressure and pain.

The physical therapists here at Spine and Sports Medicine do not only work with you during your allotted appointment time, they also educate you on how to modify your lifestyle outside of our office to prevent future muscle spasms and protect yourself from further injuries.

If you suffer from lumbar muscle spasms and are unaware of the cause, call us now to make an immediate appointment (212 986-3888). A serious underlying medical problem may be present and delaying treatment can cause it to worsen. Our office is conveniently located in Midtown Manhattan, Madison Avenue and 40th Street. Most insurance covers muscle spasms.

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